Last edited by Dole
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

5 edition of Decorated medieval floor tiles of Somerset found in the catalog.

Decorated medieval floor tiles of Somerset

by Barbara J. Lowe

  • 328 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Somerset Archaeological and Natural History Society, Somerset County Museums Service in Taunton, Somerset .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Tiles,
  • England,
  • Somerset.
    • Subjects:
    • Pavements, Tile -- England -- Somerset.,
    • Tiles, Medieval -- England -- Somerset.,
    • Tiles -- England -- Somerset.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 157-158).

      StatementBarbara J. Lowe.
      ContributionsSomerset Archaeological and Natural History Society.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsNA3544.S66 L68 2003
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvi, 160 p. :
      Number of Pages160
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3328891M
      ISBN 10086183366X
      LC Control Number2004303779
      OCLC/WorldCa56460745

        A number of Medieval floor tiles were discovered at the site. Concentrated in the western area of the complex, such expensive decorations are normally found in religious sites. These motifs are typical of south and south-west England, with similar examples known from sites such as Glastonbury Abbey. Keynsham Abbey located in Keynsham, Somerset, England, was a monastic abbey founded c. by William, Earl of abbey was established as a house of Augustinian canons regular, and operated until the dissolution of the monasteries in

      This consists of two volumes discussing and illustrat tiles in meticulous detail, the oldest from the late Anglo-Saxon period and the most recent from the sixteenth century. This work is far from being a simple catalogue and is founded on Eames’ "understanding of the medieval craft and its place in medieval economic and art history". They are sections of thick medieval floor tiles - amazingly they could be years old. Sections of Medieval Floor Tile Found Mudlarking on the Thames In the 13 th century churches, monasteries, abbeys and later royal palaces and houses of the wealthy began to use large square, decorated tiles, to cover floors and walkways.

      The Independent Books the largest and most important collection of medieval floor-tiles in the world. than 3, tiles from Chertsey Abbey and the decorated wall-tiles from Tring.   Most houses would be thatched, tiled with wooden shingles or roofed with stone tiles in the time about which I write. We know that professional tilers were established in the late 13th century and probably before this and we think that the tile makers worked for the major abbeys, castles and houses of the great, producing mostly decorated floor tiles.


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Decorated medieval floor tiles of Somerset by Barbara J. Lowe Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is a catalogue of medieval deocrated floor tiles from the historic (up until ) county of Somerset. It is intended primarily as a source of reference for archaeologists, museum staff, art historians and those studying design.5/5(2).

1 Used from £ This book is a catalogue of medieval deocrated floor tiles from the historic (up until ) county of Somerset. It is intended primarily as a source of reference for archaeologists, museum staff, art historians and those studying design.5/5(2).

Get this from a library. Decorated medieval floor tiles of Somerset. [Barbara J Lowe; Somerset Archaeological and Natural History Society.]. Description A catalogue of decorated medieval floor tiles within the historic county of Decorated medieval floor tiles of Somerset book.

A useful reference for working archaeologists, museum staff, art historians, students of design and anybody interested in tile design. The catalogue includes illustrations of different tile design with accompanying description. Paperback. Condition: New.

Language: English. Brand new Book. During the Middle Ages decorative floor tiles were used in abbey churches, royal palaces, parish churches and the homes of wealthy citizens. Tiles were durable and hygienic and added a new decorative element to the interior. ceramic floor & wall tile scored whites and light blues with aged finish and trims multiple patterns, sizes, & colors available /8" x /8" ceramic wall tile beveled with colorful comic-book inspired prints.

bora. tessera decor. /4" x /4" ceramic floor & wall tile. This book is a catalogue of medieval deocrated floor tiles from the historic (up until ) county of Somerset. It is intended primarily as a source of reference for archaeologists, museum staff, art historians and those studying g: floor tiles.

Ceramic floor tiles first appeared in medieval England during the thirteenth century and were mainly used to adorn the interiors of buildings associated with religious institutions. Tiles of various designs and colors decorated the flooring of important buildings such as churches, monasteries, and chapterhouses.

Under her supervision they were displayed on the floor of a specialist tile gallery but they have since been removed to the walls of an all-purpose medieval room. The tiles were made by impressing a wooden stamp in the red clay body of the tile, infilling the impression with white clay, glazing and baking.

Tile flooring has the ability to seamlessly fit within a multitude of styles, making it perfectly suited for any trend. Bigger is becoming better when it comes to size. Large-format tiles are more popular than ever, and the minimal grout lines they present give a smooth, cohesive appearance to your floor.

Workers looking for a place to rebury coffins in Bath Abbey have uncovered a complete medieval tiled floor buried two metres (ft) down. It is believed the tiles date from the late 13th or. 2.^ Barbara J. Lowe, Decorated Medieval Floor Tiles of Somerset (Somerset Archaeological and Natural History Society and Somerset County Museums Service, Taunton, ).

3.^ Susan Rasey, 'Sylvia Packard and the tile mural at the Royal School, Bath', Glazed Expressions, () 35, pp The production of medieval floor tiles extended from the mid 13th to the mid 16th century. Owing to the expense involved, the earliest commissions would have been schemes for the paving of royal palaces, the houses of rich laymen, and ecclesiastical and conventual buildings.

Medieval tiles have been found at Bridgwater Friary, a Franciscan monastery built around AD, the remains of which. This study of the design, manufacture and use of medieval floor tiles shows the long-lasting influence achieved in the north of England, especially by the Cistercian monasteries.

It serves to demonstrate how these monastic houses made use of the resources and contacts available to them. The study focuses on one of the richest medieval floor tile assemblages in the world, with material from The ‘amazing’ discovery was made at Bath Abbey in Somerset – which was initially founded in the 10th century – as part of vital repair work to the Abbey’s collapsing floor.

A stunning thirteenth century tiled floor has been found two meters (ft) below the current floor level at a medieval Abbey, in what has been portrayed as a ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ discovery. Using one tile on all the walls, floor to ceiling, can help open a space up.

Switching to another tile partway up the wall can visually cut the room off, making it appear smaller. If you’re using both tile and paint on the walls, using similar colors will help smoothly transition from one space to another without hard stops.

Decorated Medieval Floor Tiles of Somerset by Barbara J. Lowe () out of 5 stars 2. Paperback. 2 offers from £ Medieval Tiles - Mandalas and Patterns: A Relax and De-Stress Colouring Book Sharla Race.

Paperback. £Reviews: 5. The next group of tiles came from a Somerset tilery operating at the same time or just after the Gloucestershire tilery.

By c. the entire church was paved along with the sacristy and chapterhouse, using tiles made by a local industry. There was no revival of tile-making after the midth century. Rural tile factories specializing in mass-production of floor tiles for wide distribution began in the 14th century, and roof tiles probably began at a similar date in the south.

Floor tiles are known from the Late Saxon period, but they were not in frequent use before the 13th century, and were mostly found in ecclesiastical or royal buildings.

The rounded apse at the east end of the church is covered in fifteenth century tiles. The tiles were produced by master craftsmen in workshops and kilns set up on site between and The guide book notes that originally there would have been approximat tiles.

Top 50 Best Kitchen Floor Tile Ideas – Flooring Designs The kitchen is frequently cited as the most used room in one’s house, and it’s not a hard statistic to believe. Where else can one find nourishment, social activity, and all the comforts domestic bliss provides?Medieval floor tiles at Hailes Abbey (endowed by King John's son Richard, Earl of Cornwall, - ) showing the double eagle symbol of the King of the Romans.

Earl Richard was inter alia the only Englishman to be elected as King of the Romans, and could have upgraded to Holy Roman Emperor but never made it to Rome to see the Pope about this pins.

Floor tiles with a wealth of different patterns and designs were used during the Middle Ages, in churches, cathedrals, royal palaces, and the homes of wealthy citizens. Durable and hygenic, these tiles were a fashionable decorative element in medieval s: 5.